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Training with the Verein Hirschmann

June 26, 2018

 

Back home in Wales from a week well spent with the Verein Hirschhman on the Schweißhundführerlehrgang in Solling,Germany.

Another informative and enjoyable time spent-and not a gun in my hand the whole time.

An array of topics discussed in great detail by some truly experienced and knowledgeable dog handlers and hunters.

First day we spent out in the forest setting up a shot site, and to examine the damage a bullet can cause.

Looking carefully at the shot site to examine every little piece of meat, hair and bone.

Taking into account the shot from the hunters perspective and possible outcomes. 

 

With more CSI work looking at different injuries and scenarios of shot boar and deer, and how best to approach them, and how best to recover them with a-dog.

Leaving in most cases a number of hours before attempting to track and locate the animal, this is by far the best possible method to adopt and gives the best chance of recovery.

Discussing the dangerous side of tracking and the need to have a level of first aid, if and when the time comes to treat the dog as and when they go head to head with a wild boar and sometimes deer.

 

 

 

A favorite topic of mine.Making a hair book from a boar and red hind and establishing the different hair that covers the animal.

 From hoof to nose they’re all different, trying to decide what goes where. 

There are 12 different types of distinguishable hair on a wild boar and 15 types on a deer all giving a better understanding of where an animal has been struck.

 

Again another firm favourite.

Discussing the fundamentals of training a young puppy, and starting at the shot site.

Not necessarily attempting hour long tracks, more so getting the puppy to identify and find the shot site.

The importance of positive results always finishing on a high from beginning to end.
The importance of scent and introducing young dogs to a variety of game to get them accustomed to the different sights and smells.

Always conditioning the dog to success, and always praising during the early stages.

Setting up the training in favor of success for a young dog.

 

More practical shot site discussion and how best to follow up.

What to do on leg, jaw, gut shot animals etc.

Again, always noting that waiting is the best option, more often over 3 hours to have a chance of success, even returning the next morning.

Lots of discussing the various outcomes and best approach to finding the animal. 

 

 

Quizz time and guessing which animal/ bits go where!
Quite a challenge when your faced with just fragments.

 

Final day was preparation for the Pendalsau during training and Varprufong.

Letting the dog work things out but always being on hand to assist and back the dog up if needed.

 

 

All in all a very enjoyable week, leaving with a few more friends along the way.

A sincere thank you to the organizers and participants for their welcome and patience with my endless questions,  our passion and love for our dogs remain the same.

A very special place and shows how much these dogs mean to each handler going forward looking for injured Game.

Waidmannsheil.

 

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